Nurse Nellie Spindler died 100 years ago today

Network member and musician Martin Purdy has commemorated the death of a First World War nurse in song. On the one hundredth anniversary of Nellie Spindler’s death, Martin has written a brief introduction to the commemorative project for us. Please do check out the song, and hopefully plenty of our members will be able to catch a performance from Harp and a Monkey soon!


On this day 100 years ago (August 21, 1917), Nellie Spindler, a nurse from Wakefield in Yorkshire, was resting in her tent after a hard night-shift at the No.32 British Casualty Clearing Station in Brandhoek, Belgium, when a German shell fragment  pierced the canvass, hit her and killed her.

The sacrifice of Nellie Spindler, and nurses in the First World War in general, has been the focus of a recent project involving the folk experimentalists and storytelling trio Harp and a Monkey – and they have released a video today (which you can view by clicking the link below) to mark the anniversary of Nellie’s death.

Harp and a Monkey – ‘Clean White Sheets’

Martin Purdy, the band’s frontman and a First World War historian, said: “Recent events to mark the centenary of the opening of the Third Battle of Ypres, or ‘Passchendaele’, have focused on the soldiers, but it would seem fitting today to spare a thought for the nursing staff, many of whom – like Nellie Spindler – were never too far from danger.”

‘Clean White Sheets’ (The Nellie Spindler Song) was inspired by the work of secondary school children from Nellie’s home town, who worked with Professor Christine Hallett from Manchester University to remember the sacrifices of their local heroine, who was only in her mid-twenties when she died.

NellieSpindler
Nellie Spindler

Martin added: “The idea of Clean White Sheets is based around the memoirs of the wounded, who would often judge how close they were to home – and safety – by how clean the sheets were. It just seemed like a very simple but evocative and powerful image.”

As well as performing their standard shows, Harp and a Monkey have spent the past two years highlighting different aspects of the First World War, and challenging stereotypes about it, by performing in unusual venues related to the conflict on home shores. This has seen the Lancashire trio perform to the inmates of a prison that once housed conscientious objectors; disabled veterans on a community purpose-built for the maimed in 1919; at the scene of a Zeppelin attack in the middle of the West Pennine Moors; at the former parish church of the most decorated WW1 clergyman; inside the pithead of a mine that was crucial to the war effort; in front of the railway van that brought home the body of the Unknown Warrior; and on the site of a former WW1 aerodrome.

In coming weeks they will perform two more free shows open to the general public:

The first show will be on Sunday, September 10 inside a First World War military hut in a farm field in Suffolk.  More than 800,000 volunteers needed housing around the country after the outbreak of the war in 1914, and providing the huts to do so became the biggest building project of its kind ever undertaken. After the conflict, many of the huts went on to have useful lives and some are still found in communities around the country today under the guise of scout huts, churches, church halls and the like. A project is now underway (courtesy of the Khaki Devil organisation) to restore and preserve a number of these huts and build a museum around them, and it is this collection that will provide the backdrop to the Harp and a Monkey show at Brook Farm, Bells Lane, Hawstead, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk IP29 5NW.  The show starts at 2pm, is free and suitable for all ages.

The second show will be on Saturday, September 30 at the Heritage Centre in Crossgates Library, Leeds. This is the community that housed the Barnbow munitions factory during the First World War in which there was a huge explosion in December 1916 that killed 35 of the female workers and injured many more. Sadly, many of the dead could only be identified by discs with their names on that they wore around their necks. Because of the censorship at the time, the explosion was kept secret and production started again soon afterwards in the affected workroom. It would be six years after the end of the war before the story was made public. The memorial to the dead is near to the heritage centre on Farm Road, which also hosts an exhibition about the event. The show starts at 1pm, is free and once again suitable for all ages.

The performances include field recordings and interviews with veterans, new songs and re-workings of traditional and contemporaneous songs. The shows are tied to the band’s critically acclaimed third album ‘War Stories’, which was described by the likes of The Observer as “bold and brilliant”.


Martin Purdy is a former newspaper editor, battlefield tour guide and First World War advisor to the likes of the BBC Who Do You Think You Are? magazine – for whom he wrote a book in 2008 (reprinted in 2013) on how to research First World War service people. He is the co-author of two popular First World War books (The Gallipoli Oak and Doing Our Bit) and has written numerous articles and academic papers on the subject. He gained his BA and MA (researching Roman Catholic chaplains in the First World War) at UCLAN and is awaiting his viva voce for a doctorate completed as a collaborative doctoral award (on war disability and philanthropy) between Lancaster University and the Westfield War Memorial Village. He has fronted the modern folk trio Harp and a Monkey for 10 years.

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Call for Papers: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War

1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War is an English-language online reference work on World War I dedicated to publishing high quality peer-reviewed content. Each article in the encyclopedia is a self-contained publication and its author receives full recognition. All articles receive a distinct URL address as well as a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and are fully citable as scholarly publications. 1914-1918-online is an open access publication, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum worldwide dissemination of content. FWWNetwork’s own Christopher Phillips has recently contributed an article, and thoroughly recommends the 1914-1918-online team for their professionalism and support throughout the submission process.

The editors invite academics to contribute articles on a select number of topics not yet covered by our invitation-only editorial process. Authors who are interested in submitting a paper on any of the subjects listed should submit a short CV with a publication list, as well as an abstract (max. 250 words) or a full-length paper.

Please find the list of open articles and submission forms here: http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/call-for-papers.

For Class and Country

We are delighted to announce the publication of steering committee member David Swift’s first book, For Class and Country: The Patriotic Left and the First World War with Liverpool University Press.

About the book: The First World War has often suffered from comparison to the Second, in terms of both public interest and the significance ascribed to it by scholars in the shaping of modern Britain. This is especially so for the relationship between the Left and these two wars. For the Left, the Second World War can be seen as a time of triumph: a united stand against fascism followed by a landslide election win and a radical, reforming Labour government. The First World War is more complex. Given the gratuitous cost in lives, the failure of a ‘fit country for heroes to live in’ to materialise, the deep recessions and unemployment of the inter-war years, and the botched peace settlements which served only to precipitate another war, the Left has tended to view the conflict as an unmitigated disaster and unpardonable waste. This has led to a tendency on the Left to see the later conflict as the ‘good’ war, fought against an obvious evil, and the earlier conflict as an imperialist blunder; the result of backroom scheming, secret pacts and a thirst for colonies. This book hopes to move away from a concentration on machinations at the elite levels of the labour movement, on events inside Parliament and intellectual developments; there is a focus on less well-visited material.

You can learn more about this book, and purchase a copy, via the Liverpool University Press website. Congratulations to David!