CFP: 1918-2018: The End of the War & The Reshaping of a Century

‘1918-2018: The End of the War & The Reshaping of a Century’, 6-8 September 2018, University of Wolverhampton

This conference, hosted by the Centre for Historical Research at the University of Wolverhampton in association with the WFA and the FWW Network for Early Career & Postgraduate Researchers, seeks to spotlight the latest research on the events of 1918 as well as the global significances, consequences, and legacy of this watershed year.

The conference will include keynote addresses from some of the leading names in the field: Professor Alison Fell (Leeds), Professor Peter Frankopan (Oxford), Professor John Horne (TCD), Professor Gary Sheffield (Wolverhampton), Professor Sir Hew Strachan (St Andrews), Professor Laura Ugolini (Wolverhampton) & Professor Jay Winter (Yale).

We invite abstracts for 20-minute presentations fitting within the conference topic. Therein we encourage international perspectives and seek a range of historical approaches together with cross-disciplinary insights. Suggested themes may include but are not limited to:

  • Warfare in 1918
  • The War in 1918
  • Women in 1918
  • Strategy, Tactics & Technology
  • Victory & Defeat
  • Winners & Losers
  • Peace & (Ongoing) Conflict
  • Revolution(s)
  • Aftermaths, Legacies & Impacts
  • Veterans (Male & Female)
  • Civilians & Consequences
  • Gender, Class, Race & Ethnicity
  • Ends & Beginnings
  • Learning/Understanding the War
  • Commemoration & Memory
  • The Centenary

We welcome submissions from scholars, including early career researchers & postgraduate students, as well as independent researchers, organisations, and community projects.

The First World War Network is delighted to be among the institutions supporting this conference, and we are keen to encourage members to submit submissions on relevant topics. We hope to be in a position to offer a limited number of bursaries to help support the participation of ECRs/PGRs in this event, and will be providing opportunities for ECR/PGR development as part of the conference. For further details, please contact Dr Oli Wilkinson at the address below.

Abstracts of 250 words should be accompanied by your name, affiliation (if applicable) and a brief biographical statement (c. 100 words). Panel submissions will also be considered.

Submissions should be directed to Dr Oli Wilkinson: O.Wilkinson@wlv.ac.uk by 3 January 2018.

A PDF copy of the call for papers can be downloaded from this link: 1918-2018 Conference CFP.

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Research and Teaching Workshop – Review

Lucie Whitmore, a PhD student at the University of Glasgow, co-founder of War Through Other Stuff, and member of the First World War Network, has kindly provided this review of our Research and Teaching Workshop, which took place last month at the University of Sheffield. The First World War Network are hard at work planning our next event now, and would love to hear your thoughts on what kind of specialist training and discussion YOU would like to see us provide. Join us by visiting the link below and completing our introductory questionnaire, and keep up with all the latest news by following us on Twitter @FwwNetwork:

How to join

Many thanks to Lucie for sharing her thoughts with us!


On July 18th, the First World War Network held their latest event at the University of Sheffield; a teaching and research workshop for postgraduates and early career researchers working on projects related to the First World War. I travelled down from Edinburgh for the event, and I’m so glad I braved the eight-hour round trip as the workshop proved not only to be incredibly helpful, but also a lovely opportunity to put faces to names and connect with other researchers.

The day started with a three-minute summary of research from every attendee, meaning that by the end of the first session we had a good idea of who everyone was and what they were working on. (Isn’t it nice at the end of a conference when you finally get a sense of all the different skills and interests in the room? This was like that – except at the start of the day, hooray!) While many of the attendees were PhD students like me, a good range of disciplines and backgrounds were also represented, and the chance to ask each other questions about our projects and experiences was very welcomed by all. A couple of projects discussed in this session with an online presence include:

 

Lunch
Delegates enjoying lunch following the three-minute thesis session.

After a nice long lunch break and a chance to chat with other attendees, we moved on to a session on teaching the First World War. Professor Alison Fell and Dr Chris Phillips led this session, with the aim to help us construct First World War-related teaching modules for undergraduate students. I have never done undergraduate teaching so I found all aspects of this session incredibly useful, with the First World War subject matter a bonus! By the end of this session we had all constructed teaching modules in small groups which we presented to the rest of the room. (I hope the ‘Dressing the First World War’ module Jenny Roberts and I designed comes to fruition one day!) One thing that I particularly liked about the teaching session was the reminder that there are infinite approaches we can take to the study and teaching of the history of war, as demonstrated by the great variety of ideas that were being discussed around the room.

Fell Phillips
Professor Alison Fell and Dr Christopher Phillips getting to grips with learning outcomes.

The last session was led by Dr Matthew Ford, founder and editor-in-chief of the British Journal for Military History, and Dr Martin Hurcombe, co-editor of the Journal of War and Culture Studies. In this session, we all learned a huge amount about the journal publishing process, and particularly the kinds of decisions editors make about the content they publish. Both Matthew and Martin were very generous in sharing stories and advice from their quite different careers as journal editors. A few key pointers that I noted down from this session were:

  • When submitting an article to a journal make sure you have read their ‘house rules’. If you have not included all the information they require, or your article is in the wrong format, it could be rejected for those reasons alone.
  • Similarly, make sure you have fully understood the remit of the journal. Don’t waste time submitting articles that may not be within their scope and interest.
  • Editors are not interested in articles that simply ‘describe’. If you find some brilliant source material, do something with it!
  • When submitting to a journal, make sure you explain why your research matters.
  • If editors come back to you with lots of feedback after peer review, or you go through multiple rounds of peer-reviewing, this probably means they really want to submit your work. They are giving you everything you need to get the work published because they see the potential in you and your work.
  • If you get a rejection or bad feedback, try putting it out of your mind for a few days and come back to it with a little distance. It may be easier to digest!
Ford Hurcombe
Dr Matthew Ford and Dr Martin Hurcombe fielding questions on everything journal-related.

The day ended with a quick visit to the pub before we all jumped back onto our trains home. My main take away from the workshop was how helpful it had been to attend an academic event which incorporated really practical, helpful sessions as well as the chance to share research ideas. As PhD students we are (usually) given training of sorts from our universities, but it is not usually as focused or specialist as this. I certainly feel far better equipped to design a teaching module or submit a journal article, and I very much look forward to seeing what the First World War Network will be teaching us next!


Lucie Whitmore is a final year PhD student at the University of Glasgow, researching women’s fashion in the First World War. She is the co-founder of ‘War Through Other Stuff’, and will be co-editing a special themed issue of the British Journal for Military History.

You can access the call for papers now! 

https://warthroughotherstuff.wordpress.com/journal/

 

Call for Papers: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War

1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War is an English-language online reference work on World War I dedicated to publishing high quality peer-reviewed content. Each article in the encyclopedia is a self-contained publication and its author receives full recognition. All articles receive a distinct URL address as well as a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) and are fully citable as scholarly publications. 1914-1918-online is an open access publication, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum worldwide dissemination of content. FWWNetwork’s own Christopher Phillips has recently contributed an article, and thoroughly recommends the 1914-1918-online team for their professionalism and support throughout the submission process.

The editors invite academics to contribute articles on a select number of topics not yet covered by our invitation-only editorial process. Authors who are interested in submitting a paper on any of the subjects listed should submit a short CV with a publication list, as well as an abstract (max. 250 words) or a full-length paper.

Please find the list of open articles and submission forms here: http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/call-for-papers.

1918 – 2018: The End of the War & The Reshaping of a Century

Save the dates! Between 6 and 8 September 2018, the Centre for Historical Research at the University of Wolverhampton, in collaboration with the Western Front Association and the FWWNetwork, will be hosting a major international conference entitled 1918-2018: The End of the War and the Reshaping of a Century.

2018 represents a major milestone in the history of the First World War, not least because it marks the centenary anniversary of the end of the conflict. This encompassing conference seeks to spotlight the latest research on the events of 1918 as well as the global significance, consequences, and legacies of this watershed year. It encourages international perspectives and seeks to encompass a wide range of historical approaches as well as cross-disciplinary insights.

The event will feature keynote addresses from some of the leading academic authorities on the First World War and what came afterwards, along with panel sessions from established and emerging academic researchers. Moreover, the event is being developed in collaboration with heritage agencies, museums, art galleries, funders, schools and community groups involved in First World War research, remembrance and events. FWWNetwork will be working hard to support postgraduate students and early career researchers’ involvement in the event.

Keynote contributions include:

Professor Alison Fell (University of Leeds)

Dr Peter Frankopan (University of Oxford)

Professor John Horne (Trinity College Dublin)

Professor Sir Hew Strachan (University of St Andrews)

Professor Jay Winter (Yale University)

We ask you to ‘Save the Date’ and we invite expressions of interest from scholars (including early career and postgraduate researchers), independent researchers, organisations, groups and individuals interested in participating (as either contributor or attendee) in the conference.

A formal call for papers will follow in summer 2017.

Organising Committee:

The conference is being organised by: Professor Stephen Badsey, Professor John Buckley, Dr Simon Constantine, Dr Spencer Jones, Professor Gary Sheffield, Professor Laura Ugolini and Dr Oliver Wilkinson.

Contact:

To register your interest or for any further enquires please contact:

Dr Oliver Wilkinson (O.Wilkinson@wlv.ac.uk)

Keep up-to-date with all the latest event news at our website (www.wlv.ac.uk/1918to2018) or by following us on twitter (@1918to2018)

 

The First World War in 2014 -15: new commemoration projects, new public narratives?

Here is the abstract for Dr Helen McCartney’s keynote address, which will be delivered on Friday 26th February:

For the last few decades, British public scripts about the First World War have stressed horror and casualties leading to an interpretation that both the objectives of the war and the way in was prosecuted were futile.  Other meanings and interpretations were crowded out and the war was seen through a narrow, national lens.

The paper seeks to examine whether these familiar scripts and their omissions are being challenged or reinforced by new commemorative projects.  By analyzing a range of new projects from 2014 and 2015, including letter to the Unknown Soldier (2014), the Tower of London poppy installation (2014 -15) and British Gallipoli commemorations (2015), the paper will seek to establish how a variety of different local and national interest groups construct commemorative projects and interact with them.  It will argue that alongside the futility script is an opposing sacrificial narrative that stresses the debt owed for ‘freedom’ today. Neither of the public narratives is rooted in a complex understanding of the war and its issues and empathetic and emotional approaches to commemoration help to shape the emerging scripts.

Conference Programme Update

First of all, a huge, huge thank you to all those who submitted abstracts – and to those who assisted in spreading the word about our conference – the response has been exceptional.

The organising committee is now in the process of reviewing all submissions and will be meeting during the week ending Friday 14th August to finalise arrangements for the conference. We are fully aware of the needs of those intending to travel from overseas to make travel arrangements as quickly as possible, and we will endeavour to contact ALL applicants, both successful and unsuccessful, as soon as we can after this date.

The organising committee would like to thank you all for your patience during this period.